Fentanyl

Fentanyl

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    Fentanyl is part of a group of drugs known as Opioids. Opioids interact with opioid receptors in the brain and elicit a range of responses within the body; from feelings of pain relief, to relaxation, pleasure and contentment. It is prescribed in the event of chronic, severe pain as a result of cancer, nerve damage, back injury, major trauma and surgery.

    It is about 80 to 100 times stronger than morphine.

  • Fentanyl is available in many forms. Pharmaceutical fentanyl is used for managing acute or chronic pain. Illicit fentanyl can be manufactured for use in the illegal drug market.

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    Medicinal use

    Medicinal fentanyl comes in a number of different forms and strengths including:
    • Transdermal patches 
    • Lozenges/lollipops
    • Intravenous injection 

  • Illicit use

    Some people use fentanyl illegally by extracting the fentanyl from the patch and injecting it. This is very risky as it is extremely hard to judge a dose size. Fentanyl can be ‘diverted’. Diversion occurs when medication that is prescribed by a medical professional, is not used appropriately, or is given or sold to a third party. Fentanyl is sometimes mixed with other drugs to increase potency.

    Illicitly manufactured fentanyl can be:

    • a stand alone product
    • a low cost additive to increase the potency of other illicit drugs such as heroin
    • sold as counterfeit medicines (such as oxycodone)

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1 DOSE : Heroin Vs Fentanyl Vs Carfentanil (Carfentanil or carfentanyl is a structural analog of the synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl)

Side Effects of Fentanyl

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    There is no safe level of drug use. Use of any drug always carries risk.

    Fentanyl affects everyone differently, based on:

    • Size, weight and health
    • Whether the person is used to taking it
    • Whether other drugs are taken around the same time
    • The amount taken
    • The strength of the drug (varies between patches)

    Copied
    There is no safe level of drug use. Use of any drug always carries risk.

    Fentanyl affects everyone differently, based on:

    • Size, weight and health
    • Whether the person is used to taking it
    • Whether other drugs are taken around the same time
    • The amount taken
    • The strength of the drug (varies between patches)

  • You may experience:

    Relief from pain

    Nausea, vomiting

    Constipation and/or diarrhea

    Reduced appetite

    Wind, indigestion, cramps

    Drowsiness, confusion

    Weakness or fatigue

    Dizziness
    Euphoria

    Headache

    Incoherent or slurred speech

    Impaired balance

    Slow pulse and lowered blood pressure

    Rash (inflammation, itch, swelling at patch site)

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    You may experience:

    Relief from pain

    Nausea, vomiting

    Constipation and/or diarrhea

    Reduced appetite

    Wind, indigestion, cramps

    Drowsiness, confusion

    Weakness or fatigue

    Dizziness
    Euphoria

    Headache

    Incoherent or slurred speech

    Impaired balance

    Slow pulse and lowered blood pressure

    Rash (inflammation, itch, swelling at patch site)

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    Long-term effects:

    Mood instability

    Reduced libido

    Constipation

    Menstrual problems

    Respiratory impairment

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    Long-term effects:

    Mood instability

    Reduced libido

    Constipation

    Menstrual problems

    Respiratory impairment

Fentanyl Overdose

Mixing Fenatnyl with other drugs

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    Fentanyl + Alcohol

     

    Adds to adverse effects and may increase the risk of respiratory depression.

  • Fentanyl + Antidepressants

     

    May result in severe unpredictable reactions.

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    Fentanyl + benzodiazepines

     

    May add to the sedative effects and diminished breathing.

The effects of taking Fentanyl with other drugs – including over-the-counter or prescribed medications can be unpredictable and dangerous.